The International Social Housing Festival (ISHF) is a global celebration of the long tradition of decent, affordable housing for all aiming to generate convincing responses to current and future challenges. A series of in total 45 events, exhibitions, meetings, field visits and community activities took place from June 13th to June 21st 2017 in Amsterdam.

A diverse alliance of partners, including Aedes-The Federation of Dutch Social Housing Organizations, the Amsterdam Federation of Housing CorporationsHousing Europe-the European Federation of Public, Cooperative and Social Housing, the Municipality of Amsterdam, and the historical Amsterdam School Museum Het Schip, invited all sorts of housing professionals, policy makers, tenants, academia and the wider public to join on a journey through the history of the social housing sector, with a view to preparing it for a future of surprises and challenges.

Why an ISHF? Why in Amsterdam? The context

The Netherlands is a country with a world-leading (in both the pioneering and exemplary contexts) tradition in social housing, and Amsterdam, as the capital and largest city, has always been at the centre of this. The starting point and symbolic core of the festival will be the Museum Het Schip, which is one of the architectural icons of the ‘Amsterdam School’ architectural movement which celebrated 100 years in 2016.

Part of international expressionist architecture, Het Schip is noted for its tasteful brickwork and intricate masonry details, both inside and out, reflecting the revolutionary vision of a universally liveable and socially inclusive Amsterdam. The 20th-Century Dutch vision of social housing, exemplified by Het Schip, was ground-breaking in that it provided workers and low income groups with housing that did not just provide them with all their necessities but was also aesthetically pleasing- a home to truly be proud of. Within the festival, Museum Het Schip is the point of entry for a journey that will lead organisers and participants well beyond the Dutch and the European borders.

In 1901, the Dutch parliament passed the Housing Act. This allowed a variety of collectives to organize housing projects. Across the Netherlands many social housing corporations were established, tasked with delivering an enormous amount of quality yet affordable dwellings. While the system and organizations have evolved since then, the driving force remains the same: providing people with low incomes with good and affordable housing in liveable communities. However, the history of Dutch social housing is not only of progress from the top down, with input from and collaboration with tenants a driving force behind many projects.

Recently, housing policy in most European countries has been increasingly trusted to market forces. There are questions to be answered on how long-sighted this is, given the resurgent challenges of rapid urbanization, changing lifestyles, globalization, migration and climate change, all these re-invigorating the case for universally accessible housing to safeguard our populations’ social well-being. Actors at all scales need to collaborate on proactive and inventive policies to tackle these challenges head-on and provide adequate and affordable housing for all. This is where the ISHF comes in.

Organizational structure

The ISHF was conceived by a group of international participants at Summer School ‘Thinking City, the dynamics of making Amsterdam’. The five ‘founding partners’ of AFWC, Aedes, Museum Het Schip and Housing Europe adopted the initiative and are co-organizing the festival. The festival is being organised by a dedicated project team led by festival director Pepijn Bakker.

The International Social Housing Festival (ISHF) is a global celebration of the long tradition of decent, affordable housing for all aiming to generate convincing responses to current and future challenges. A series of in total 45 events, exhibitions, meetings, field visits and community activities took place from June 13th to June 21st 2017 in Amsterdam.

A diverse alliance of partners, including Aedes-The Federation of Dutch Social Housing Organizations, the Amsterdam Federation of Housing CorporationsHousing Europe-the European Federation of Public, Cooperative and Social Housing, the Municipality of Amsterdam, and the historical Amsterdam School Museum Het Schip, invited all sorts of housing professionals, policy makers, tenants, academia and the wider public to join on a journey through the history of the social housing sector, with a view to preparing it for a future of surprises and challenges.

Why an ISHF? Why in Amsterdam? The context

The Netherlands is a country with a world-leading (in both the pioneering and exemplary contexts) tradition in social housing, and Amsterdam, as the capital and largest city, has always been at the centre of this. The starting point and symbolic core of the festival will be the Museum Het Schip, which is one of the architectural icons of the ‘Amsterdam School’ architectural movement which celebrated 100 years in 2016.

Part of international expressionist architecture, Het Schip is noted for its tasteful brickwork and intricate masonry details, both inside and out, reflecting the revolutionary vision of a universally liveable and socially inclusive Amsterdam. The 20th-Century Dutch vision of social housing, exemplified by Het Schip, was ground-breaking in that it provided workers and low income groups with housing that did not just provide them with all their necessities but was also aesthetically pleasing- a home to truly be proud of. Within the festival, Museum Het Schip is the point of entry for a journey that will lead organisers and participants well beyond the Dutch and the European borders.

In 1901, the Dutch parliament passed the Housing Act. This allowed a variety of collectives to organize housing projects. Across the Netherlands many social housing corporations were established, tasked with delivering an enormous amount of quality yet affordable dwellings. While the system and organizations have evolved since then, the driving force remains the same: providing people with low incomes with good and affordable housing in liveable communities. However, the history of Dutch social housing is not only of progress from the top down, with input from and collaboration with tenants a driving force behind many projects.

Recently, housing policy in most European countries has been increasingly trusted to market forces. There are questions to be answered on how long-sighted this is, given the resurgent challenges of rapid urbanization, changing lifestyles, globalization, migration and climate change, all these re-invigorating the case for universally accessible housing to safeguard our populations’ social well-being. Actors at all scales need to collaborate on proactive and inventive policies to tackle these challenges head-on and provide adequate and affordable housing for all. This is where the ISHF comes in.

Organizational structure

The ISHF was conceived by a group of international participants at Summer School ‘Thinking City, the dynamics of making Amsterdam’. The five ‘founding partners’ of AFWC, Aedes, Museum Het Schip and Housing Europe adopted the initiative and are co-organizing the festival. The festival is being organised by a dedicated project team led by festival director Pepijn Bakker.

Housing Futures is a blog on housing strategies for cities around the globe. We share our knowledge, insights and our enthusiasm to create accessible, affordable, healthy, safe and inclusive cities.

Housing Futures is initated by the organizers of the International Social Housing Festival (ISHF) and edited by Josh Crites and Pepijn Bakker

Housing Futures is a blog on housing strategies for cities around the globe. We share our knowledge, insights and our enthusiasm to create accessible, affordable, healthy, safe and inclusive cities.

Housing Futures is initated by the organizers of the International Social Housing Festival (ISHF) and edited by Josh Crites and Pepijn Bakker

Large churches in Dutch city centers are increasingly used for general social purposes: fairs, concerts and events, instead of their religious purpose. How to make an ancient monument in a respectful yet contemporary manner suitable for this modern use? APB (Pepijn Bakker Architects) designed a cloud pavilion in the Saint John’s church in Schiedam to concentrate all the new facilities, meanwhile adding new spatial quality to the church.

craftmanship

The church is the largest and oldest church in Schiedam and contains numerous art treasures collected over the centuries. Highlights include a consistory whose walls are upholstered in gold leather, a pulpit with fine carvings, glass stained windows and an organ in Baroque style.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sintjanskerk Schiedam

Inspired by the craftsmanship of past ages, the new pavilion will be realized using ‘21st century craftsmanship’, such as computer controlled milling and 3d printing.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam view from church entrance

cloud

The architects have chosen the cloud’s shape because it’s neutral and recognizable while at the same time very exciting to experience. Its free form appeals to the same boundlessness and immensity of the surrounding church. It evokes an experience similar to Immanual Kant’s sublime experience, that he described after entering the St. Peter’s Church in Rome: ‘For there is here a feeling of the inadequacy of -the visitor’s- Imagination for presenting the Ideas of a whole, wherein the Imagination reaches its maximum, and, in striving to surpass it, sinks back into itself, by which, however, a kind of emotional satisfaction is produced.’

functionality

The space below the cloud becomes much more flexible in use. The glass wall on the church side and the gate on the choir side are air-tight, so the pavilion can be used for numerous individual meetings without being bothered by the cold and noise of the Church. By moving the coffee bar to a new place, the room can be used more freely. The bottom of the cloud is flat. Here the ventilation openings, lighting armatures and heating panels will be placed.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam

A staircase leads visitors from the coffee area to the roof. Here they may enjoy the view over the church. Visitors can learn more about the history of the church by reading the panels in the balustrade.

structure

The pavilion will be built around the existing steel beams that support the current roof of the coffee room. By doing this, the ancient wall columns and floors will not be greatly affected.

161206-diagrammen

Ambition

The design is made in a closed design competition. The organizer, St. John’s Church foundation in Schiedam decided after four months of deliberation that it does not wish to realize any of the two submitted designs, notwithstanding the ambition to modernize the church with modern means.

APB regrets the outcome of the competition. “This was a unique opportunity to create a respectful, yet contemporary addition to the church building. But the challenge to add meaningful 21st century pavilions to churches remains. Hopefully we can realize this concept somewhere else” says architect Pepijn Bakker.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam

<For English click here>

Grote kerken in Nederlandse stadscentra worden steeds minder voor religieuze en steeds meer voor algemeen maatschappelijke doeleinden gebruikt: beurzen, concerten en manifestaties. Maar hoe maak je nu een eeuwenoud monument, dat bol staat van geschiedenis op een respectvolle maar toch eigentijdse manier geschikt voor dit modern gebruik? APB (Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker) ontwierp een wolkpaviljoen voor in de Grote of Sint Janskerk in Schiedam waarin alle benodigde nieuwe voorzieningen zijn geconcentreerd en dat een nieuwe ruimtelijke kwaliteit toevoegt aan de kerk.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam view from church entrance

Vakmanschap

De kerk is de grootste en oudste kerk van Schiedam en bevat tal van door de eeuwen verzamelde kunstschatten. Hoogtepunten zijn een consistorie waarvan de wanden zijn bekleed met  goudleerbehang, een kansel met verfijnd houtsnijwerk, glas-in-lood ramen en een orgel in barokke stijl.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sintjanskerk Schiedam

Geïnspireerd door het vakmanschap in de omringende kerk, kan het nieuwe paviljoen worden gerealiseerd met ‘21st century craftmanship’, zoals computergestuurd frezen en 3d printen.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam view from cloud

Wolk

De architecten kozen voor de vorm van een wolk omdat deze vorm een gevoel van verwondering en onbegrensdheid geeft. Zoals Immanuel Kants sublieme ervaring, die hij beschreef aan de hand van binnenkomen in de Sint Pieterskerk in Rome. ‘Hier is een gevoel van ontoereikendheid van het voorstellingsvermogen van de bezoeker om het geheel te vatten. Wanneer het voorstellingsvermogen het maximum bereikt en het streeft om deze grens over te gaan, valt het terug in zichzelf in een soort roerig welgevallen.’

Functioneel

In het ontwerp vervangt de wolk een bestaande paviljoenconstructie. Het nieuwe paviljoen maakt de ruimte veel flexibeler in gebruik. De glazen wand aan de kerkzijde en het hek aan de koorzijde zijn geluid- en luchtdicht af te sluiten, zodat het paviljoen kan worden gebruikt voor tal van afzonderlijke bijeenkomsten. Een nieuwe plek van de koffiebar maakt de ruimte overzichtelijker. In de onderkant van de wolk worden de luchtverversingsinstallatie, verlichtingsarmaturen en verwarmingselementen opgenomen, zodat het er altijd licht en warm is.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam view from interior

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam

Vanuit de ruimte onder de wolk leidt een trap naar het dak van de wolk. Hier kunnen bezoekers genieten van het uitzicht over het kerkinterieur. Op panelen in de balustrade is meer te lezen over de rijke geschiedenis en kunstschatten in de kerk.

Constructie

Het paviljoen kan worden gerealiseerd rondom de bestaande stalen balken die het huidige dak van de koffieruimte ondersteunen. Daardoor zullen de eeuwenoude muren, kolommen en vloeren niet worden aangetast. De hoofdvorm van de wolk kan met computergestuurde freesmachines uit piepschuim worden uitgesneden, waarna het oppervlak bedekt wordt door een laag vezel versterkt polyester. Dit wordt ten slotte worden geschuurd en gelakt.

161206-diagrammen

Ambitie

Het ontwerp is gemaakt in een besloten ontwerpcompetitie. De uitschrijver, stichting Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam heeft na vier maanden beraad besloten dat het geen van beide ingediende ontwerpen wenst te realiseren, de ambities om de kerk met moderne middelen te moderniseren ten spijt.

APB betreurt de uitkomst van de competitie. ‘Jammer, dit was een unieke kans om een respectvolle, maar toch eigentijdse toevoeging aan het kerkgebouw te realiseren. Maar de opgave om kerken met betekenisvolle toevoegingen klaar te maken voor de 21ste eeuw blijft staan. Hopelijk kunnen we dit concept ooit ergens anders realiseren.’ zegt architect Pepijn Bakker.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam

<For English click here>

Grote kerken in Nederlandse stadscentra worden steeds minder voor religieuze en steeds meer voor algemeen maatschappelijke doeleinden gebruikt: beurzen, concerten en manifestaties. Maar hoe maak je nu een eeuwenoud monument, dat bol staat van geschiedenis op een respectvolle maar toch eigentijdse manier geschikt voor dit modern gebruik? APB (Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker) ontwierp een wolkpaviljoen voor in de Grote of Sint Janskerk in Schiedam waarin alle benodigde nieuwe voorzieningen zijn geconcentreerd en dat een nieuwe ruimtelijke kwaliteit toevoegt aan de kerk.

Vakmanschap

De kerk is de grootste en oudste kerk van Schiedam en bevat tal van door de eeuwen verzamelde kunstschatten. Hoogtepunten zijn een consistorie waarvan de wanden zijn bekleed met  goudleerbehang, een kansel met verfijnd houtsnijwerk, glas-in-lood ramen en een orgel in barokke stijl.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sintjanskerk Schiedam

Geïnspireerd door het vakmanschap in de omringende kerk, kan het nieuwe paviljoen worden gerealiseerd met ‘21st century craftmanship’, zoals computergestuurd frezen en 3d printen.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam view from cloud

Wolk

De architecten kozen voor de vorm van een wolk omdat deze vorm een gevoel van verwondering en onbegrensdheid geeft. Zoals Immanuel Kants sublieme ervaring, die hij beschreef aan de hand van binnenkomen in de Sint Pieterskerk in Rome. ‘Hier is een gevoel van ontoereikendheid van het voorstellingsvermogen van de bezoeker om het geheel te vatten. Wanneer het voorstellingsvermogen het maximum bereikt en het streeft om deze grens over te gaan, valt het terug in zichzelf in een soort roerig welgevallen.’

Functioneel

In het ontwerp vervangt de wolk een bestaande paviljoenconstructie. Het nieuwe paviljoen maakt de ruimte veel flexibeler in gebruik. De glazen wand aan de kerkzijde en het hek aan de koorzijde zijn geluid- en luchtdicht af te sluiten, zodat het paviljoen kan worden gebruikt voor tal van afzonderlijke bijeenkomsten. Een nieuwe plek van de koffiebar maakt de ruimte overzichtelijker. In de onderkant van de wolk worden de luchtverversingsinstallatie, verlichtingsarmaturen en verwarmingselementen opgenomen, zodat het er altijd licht en warm is.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Sint Janskerk Schiedam view from interior

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam

Vanuit de ruimte onder de wolk leidt een trap naar het dak van de wolk. Hier kunnen bezoekers genieten van het uitzicht over het kerkinterieur. Op panelen in de balustrade is meer te lezen over de rijke geschiedenis en kunstschatten in de kerk.

Constructie

Het paviljoen kan worden gerealiseerd rondom de bestaande stalen balken die het huidige dak van de koffieruimte ondersteunen. Daardoor zullen de eeuwenoude muren, kolommen en vloeren niet worden aangetast. De hoofdvorm van de wolk kan met computergestuurde freesmachines uit piepschuim worden uitgesneden, waarna het oppervlak bedekt wordt door een laag vezel versterkt polyester. Dit wordt ten slotte worden geschuurd en gelakt.

161206-diagrammen

Ambitie

Het ontwerp is gemaakt in een besloten ontwerpcompetitie. De uitschrijver, stichting Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam heeft na vier maanden beraad besloten dat het geen van beide ingediende ontwerpen wenst te realiseren, de ambities om de kerk met moderne middelen te moderniseren ten spijt.

APB betreurt de uitkomst van de competitie. ‘Jammer, dit was een unieke kans om een respectvolle, maar toch eigentijdse toevoeging aan het kerkgebouw te realiseren. Maar de opgave om kerken met betekenisvolle toevoegingen klaar te maken voor de 21ste eeuw blijft staan. Hopelijk kunnen we dit concept ooit ergens anders realiseren.’ zegt architect Pepijn Bakker.

APB Architectenbureau Pepijn Bakker Grote of Sint Janskerk Schiedam